William Klein: Photographs. William Klein, John Heilpern, text.
William Klein: Photographs
William Klein: Photographs
William Klein: Photographs
William Klein: Photographs
William Klein: Photographs

William Klein: Photographs. An Aperture Monograph

New York: Aperture, Inc., 1981. 1st Edition. Folio, publisher's photo-illustrated paper-covered boards lettered in red and black, black endpapers, original photo-illustrated dust jacket.

"What would please me most is to make photographs as incomprehensible as life." Monograph on photographer and filmmaker William Klein. Formally trained as a painter by Fernand Léger, Klein began his work in photography in the early 1950s on a whim, employing a wide-angle lens and high-speed film to capture experimental photos of his paintings while in motion. When art director of US Vogue Alexander Lieberman saw his work in Paris, he offered Klein a position as staff photographer, in company with Richard Avedon and Henry Clarke. He went on to produce numerous award-winning photo series, short and feature-length films, and publish several photobooks, including Life is Good and Good for You In New York (1957) and Tokyo (1964). This volume was issued concurrently with a traveling exhibition of his best-known street photography, organized chronologically and by location (New York, Rome, Moscow, Tokyo, and Elsewhere). Notably, Klein was unhappy with the book’s production, believing Aperture’s director Michael Hoffman made the printing too dark. Includes a profile on Klein by late journalist and film critic Jim Hailpern; with selected bibliography. Illustrated throughout with black-and-white plates. Small sheet of personal stationery tipped to front endpaper. Minor edgewear to unclipped dust jacket. Near fine. Item #5139

$175.00

See all items in Photography
See all items by , ,