The Village Voice. Daniel Wolf, Fred McDarrah, Valerie Solanas, Andy Warhol, photographer, advertisers.
The Village Voice
The Village Voice
The Village Voice

The Village Voice. Vol. XII, No. 17. Thursday, February 9, 1967

New York: The Village Voice, Inc., 1967. Tabloid, publisher's photo-illustrated newsprint.

February 1967 issue of the Village Voice, the country's original alternative newspaper, founded in 1955 as platform for downtown New York's creative community. With articles, reviews, cartoons and opinion pieces by regular columnists and contributors, including Bill Manville, Jules Feiffer, Andrew Sarris, Jonas Mekas, and others, as well as a letter to the editor from Abbie Hoffman ("If we are going to stop [the Vietnam war], and avoid all the ones to come, we are going to have to show Americans that there is another way of exerting national identity without chopping off a lot of people's heads. We are going to have to provide them with a raison d'etre"). Among the plethora of ads for performers (Phil Ochs, Joan Rivers, Charles Aznavour, Tim Hardin, Sun Ra), recent films (Scorpio Rising, A Fistful of Dollars, Alfie, Blow-Up, Doctor Zhivago), galleries, local restaurants and businesses, is the earliest ad for radical feminist author Valerie Solanas’s SCUM Manifesto (p.6). Self-published in 1967 as a mimeograph Solanas sold on the streets of New York, the SCUM Book (as it's called here) argues that men are simply the "incomplete female" and have turned the world into "a shitpile"; Solanas proposes the formation of a revolutionary vanguard of women, SCUM (i.e., Society for Cutting Up Men), that would pave the way towards a female-dominated utopia with no men, money, disease or death. The manifesto caught the attention of her Chelsea Hotel neighbor Maurice Girodias, founder of the Olympia Press, who gave her a $500 advance for her next book, a novel. She understood this contract to mean Girodias owned all of her future work. The same year, she met Andy Warhol and approached him with the sole copy of her script "Up Your Ass," with hopes he would produce it. Ultimately Warhol wasn't interested in the script and Solanas accused him of stealing the copy as part of a paranoid conspiracy he coordinated with Girodias. The following spring, Solanas went to the Chelsea with a .32 pistol in search of Girodias; he was gone for the weekend, so she headed to the Factory. While Warhol was on the phone she fired 3 shots, missing him twice and hitting him once in the lungs, spleen, stomach, liver and esophagus. After turning herself in for the shooting later that evening, Solanas told a reporter, "Read my manifesto and it will tell you what I am." (An ad for a February 15th reading from the book by Solanas, at which copies would be available for sale, ran in the February 2nd issue of the Voice, one week earlier, but this is the first ad promoting the book on its own.) Ironically, this issue of the Voice also carries ads for Warhol's promotion of Nico and the Velvet Underground at one of their earliest public performances together, one month prior to the release of "The Velvet Underground & Nico" (p.21), and for his film The Chelsea Girls (p.29). The Voice ceased print publication in 2017, and continues in an online-only format. Several small closed tears to edges, even toning overall. Near fine. Item #1709

$250.00